Three-Ingredient Treats

Salted Caramel Ice-Cream
Wotchers!

Two treats for you today – each one minimalist on ingredients, maximum on deliciousness.

Much as I love creating challenging showstoppers such as the Seven Veils Cake or the Orange Mousse Cake, sometimes a treat that takes just minutes to prepare can be just as gratifying. I’m convinced that the very brevity of their creation contributes greatly to their enjoyment.

So I have two recipes this week that each require only three ingredients – although you can tweak one of them with additional flavourings if you like.

Salted Caramel Ice-Cream

This is a variation on the world’s easiest ice-cream. Home-made ice-cream is divine but alas for me, my kitchen is tiny, measuring just 2m x 3m. With limited cupboard and counter space, I have a strict rule that everything must be multifunctional in order to earn/retain its place and an ice-cream maker is just not feasible – it’s (relatively) large and it does one job, so it’s 0-for-2 right there.

Consequently, when I discovered the joys of the world’s simplest, no-churn ice-cream several years ago, I was delighted. The original recipe called for a tin of sweetened, condensed milk, a vanilla pod and a pint of double cream. Whisked together to firm peaks, you just spoon it into a plastic box and freeze overnight. It needs no stirring to break down ice crystals and when first frozen is almost unbelievably soft to scoop. It will firm up slightly over subsequent days, but it tastes so good, it is unlikely to last that long.

This variation swaps out the original condensed milk and vanilla for the caramel variation that Carnation have been producing for the past few years, and adds a scant teaspoon of sea salt for an absolutely incredible TASTE SENSATION as Peter Kay might put it.

As incredible and fantastic as this ice-cream is, I do feel obligated to point out that the calorific content of this recipe is 4000 kCal, which is the equivalent of a full two-days of regular food intake. A little of what you fancy does you good, inhaling an entire weekend’s worth of calories in one sitting, not so much. Snack wisely, my friends.

1 x 397g tin Carnation Caramel
600ml double cream
0.5-1tsp sea salt flakes.

  • Open the tin of caramel and stir it well, until it becomes loose and pourable. This will make it easier to mix in with the cream.
  • Pour the double cream into a bowl and whisk until it holds soft peaks.
  • Add the caramel to the cream, stirring it with the whisk to combine.
  • Sprinkle in the salt. I recommend under- rather than over-salting. You can always add more salt to serve, but too much at this stage could ruin the whole batch.
  • Whisk the mixture to stiff peaks.
  • Spoon the mixture into a plastic box, cover and freeze overnight.
  • Serve with a sprinkling of salt if liked.

Carrot Rochers
Carrot Rochers

These delightful snacks are the work of just moments to create and can be enjoyed with whatever quantities of ingredients you have to hand as it is one of my favourite types of recipe – the proportional recipe.

You can tweak the flavour of your rochers with the use of additional flavourings – a little lemon juice/zest, or spices from your favourite carrot cake recipe, or just enjoy them as is. They’re a moist and satisfying treat without being overly sweet. I’ve use finely desiccated coconut I found in the Indian food section of the supermarket. Coarser shredded coconut will give a more rustic texture to the finished rochers.

In terms of storage, I have successfully kept a batch in the fridge for a full two weeks.

Boiled/steamed carrots
An equal weight to the carrots of finely desiccated coconut
Half the weight of carrots in caster sugar.
Lemon zest/juice (optional)
Carrot cake spices (optional)

Desiccated coconut for coating

  • Puree the carrots to a smooth paste with either a stick blender or a liquidiser. The stick blender is very useful if you only have a small quantity of carrots.
  • Add the sugar and stir to dissolve.
  • Add the coconut and any other flavourings/spices and mix thoroughly.
  • The mixture should hold together when pressed. If it seems a little wet, add more coconut.
  • Use a small ice-cream scoop to portion out the mixture, or do it by hand. Roll into smooth balls about the size of a walnut.
  • Toss the balls in more coconut to coat.
  • Lay the finished rochers on a board and cover lightly with cling film.
  • Chill in the fridge for 2 hours to firm up.
  • Store long-term in an airtight container in the fridge.


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