Raspberry Upside-down Cake

Raspberry Upside-Down Cake
Wotchers!

Who doesn’t love an upside-down cake?

Well, truth be told, me, actually – until I met this one!

Whenever I think of an upside down cake, its always been pineapple, and due to the huge number of vintage recipe books I read, it always appears in my mind as being made with pineapple from a tin, and gaudy, startlingly red glacé cherries in the holes in the middles of the slices. Now whether it is the sweet tinned pinapple (not a fan), the glacé cherries (really not a fan), the sweet-on-sweet-on-sweet or the whole 1950s vibe, it just doesn’t look appealing to me.

Sidebar: surprisingly, a quick internet image search reveals that the pineapple ring/cherry thing appears to still be going strong in the 21st century. Who’da thunk.

Anyhoo…

I’ve adapted this recipe from one I found in a booklet of Breton recipes I snapped up at one of the French brocantes we wandered through this summer. Made with fresh raspberries, the sharp flavour of the soft, gently baked fruit is a great contrast with the sweet, lemon sponge. ( See also Fruit Sponge). Add cream – single, double, clotted or fraiche – if you like, but I really enjoy this as is.

Confession: OK, so in essence I really only changed the shape of the tin, the cooking time and added some filled fresh raspberries on the top for presentation. The original recipe recommended a 24cm circular tin and a shorter cooking time, but after the notorious Pacman photo of July, I’ve been a bit twitchy about using circular tins.

Sidebar 2: This is not a pretty, pretty cake. Behold, Exhibit A.

It is, however, delicious, simple to make and a perfect treat to enjoy those autumn-ripening raspberries that are a little too squishy to turn into jam.

Raspberry Upside-Down Cake

750g raspberries – divided
4tbs caster sugar

3 large eggs – separated
125g caster sugar
zest and juice of 1 lemon
125g plain flour
1tsp baking powder
100g unsalted butter

4tbs seedless raspberry jam
icing sugar

  • Grease and line the base and sides of your chosen tin with parchment paper. Grease the parchment paper. I used a long, narrow IKEA loaf tin but you could opt for the original 24cm round tin.
  • Pick out about 200g of the best raspberries for decoration. Set aside.
  • Add 450-500g fresh raspberries to the tin. Sprinkle with the 4tbs caster sugar.
  • Cut the butter into 2cm cubes and put into hand-temperature water to soften.
  • Heat the oven to 200°C, 180°C Fan.
  • Whisk the egg-whites to stiff peaks.
  • Whisk the yolks and the remaining caster sugar together until pale and fluffy – about 5 minutes.
  • Add the lemon zest and juice and mix in.
  • Sift the flour and baking powder together and add to the egg mixture gradually, ensuring the flour is fully mixed in.
  • Using a balloon whisk – or the whisk attachment of your stand mixer – stir in one third of the egg-whites to the egg mixture to lighten the mix, then gently fold in the remainder.
  • Drain the water from the butter and fold the softened butter into the mixturewith the whisk.
  • Pour the mixture over the raspberries and spread smooth.
  • Bake until the sponge is risen and cooked. This takes 40-45 minutes in a loaf tin. If you chose a 24cm round tin, the recipe suggests 25 minutes, but use your own checks to confirm the cake is cooked through.
  • When cooked, remove from the oven and set on a cooling rack. Allow the cake to cool in the tin before turning out onto your serving dish/plate and removing the baking parchment.

To decorate

  • Spoon the jam into a piping bag and snip of the end to give a 3-4mm opening.
  • Pipe a little jam into the hollow cores of the remaining raspberries.
  • Arrange the filled raspberries over the top of the cake and dust with icing suger to serve.

One Comment on “Raspberry Upside-down Cake”

  1. I’ve made a lot of different upside cakes (pineapple, apple, peach, plum, etc.) but never one with raspberries! Most definitely will have to try it when they are in season next year.


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